Can storms cause headaches?

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Misael Schamberger asked a question: Can storms cause headaches?
Asked By: Misael Schamberger
Date created: Sun, Dec 20, 2020 7:08 PM
Date updated: Thu, Jun 23, 2022 11:51 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Can storms cause headaches»

If you're prone to getting headaches, you could find that grey skies, high humidity, rising temperatures and storms can all bring on head pain. Pressure changes that cause weather changes are thought to trigger chemical and electrical changes in the brain. This irritates nerves, leading to a headache.

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Because our sinuses are filled with air, any change in that pressure can affect headaches.

During a storm, cold and warm air collide, creating an extreme difference in barometric (or air) pressure. This creates the elements of a thunderstorm, like wind and rain. The change in barometric pressure may be what triggers your headache, whether that is a migraine, tension-type headache, or a sinus headache.   That said, the idea of a storm triggering a headache is still a questionable phenomenon.

The website reads: "If you're prone to getting headaches, you could find that grey skies, high humidity, rising temperatures and storms can all bring on head pain. "Pressure changes that cause weather changes are thought to trigger chemical and electrical changes in the brain. This irritates nerves, leading to a headache.

Sun glare. High humidity. Dry air. Windy or stormy weather. Barometric pressure changes. For some people, weather changes may cause imbalances in brain chemicals, including serotonin, which can prompt a migraine. Weather-related triggers also may worsen a headache caused by other triggers.

Storms; Extremely dry conditions; Dusty environments; Listed below are common environmental triggers for headaches included in the survey and the percentage of people who identified them as...

A 2013 study out of the University of Cincinnati showed a 31% increased risk of headache and a 28% increased risk of Migraine on days lightning struck within 25 miles of study participants’ homes (2).

A person may experience a headache, or a worsened headache, due to: sudden changes in temperature or humidity high or low levels of temperature or humidity a storm, which changes the barometric...

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