Why can't you see the galaxies from nasa pictures?

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Alfredo Crona asked a question: Why can't you see the galaxies from nasa pictures?
Asked By: Alfredo Crona
Date created: Wed, Feb 17, 2021 3:34 AM
Date updated: Thu, Jun 23, 2022 7:10 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Why can't you see the galaxies from nasa pictures»

Why can't we take pictures of stars in space?

  • To take good pictures in space you need to have a high shutter speed and a very short exposure, which means our planet and satellite are clearly visible but the stars often can't be seen. On top of the unusual light conditions in space, there’s another factor, which requires rapid reaction times from the camera.

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Light is emitted from the galaxy in all directions. Only a tiny, tiny fraction of it is directed to Earth, and of that, an even tinier fraction is collected by any given telescope. But we can still see it, because galaxies are very, very bright. Andromeda contains about a trillion stars.

To take good pictures in space you need to have a high shutter speed and a very short exposure, which means our planet and satellite are clearly visible but the stars often can't be seen. On top of...

Io is severely overexposed, and the effects of that overexposure are causing something called “readout smear,” the streaky effect across the image. Why would they do that? Check out the edge of Io’s disk. You can see at least three volcanic plumes erupting off Io’s surface. At this exposure setting, there are rich details visible in the plumes.

Among their evidence is the fact that photographs and video footage don't show any stars in the sky. How could the Hollywood producers be so careless in their conspiracy? In fact, there's a pretty mundane explanation: The camera settings weren't adjusted to capture them.

It is a common misconception that the Apollo astronauts didn't see any stars. While stars don't show up in the pictures from the Apollo missions, that's because the camera exposures were set to...

NASA Image Library. NASA's image library, images.nasa.gov, consolidates imagery and videos in one searchable locations.Users can download content in multiple sizes and resolutions and see the metadata associated with images, including EXIF/camera data on many images.

Because the camera was placed in a dark location and set to take long exposures, images show an overexposed Earth against a backdrop of stars. NASA. The simple answer to your question is the ...

According to the "Fast Facts" published with that Hubble image of galaxy NGC 5584, it is about 72 million light-years away, and the photo spans 50,000 light-years. On the date of the Pluto-and-moons image (July 7, 2012), the Solar System Simulator tells us that Pluto was 4.675 billion kilometers from Earth.

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