Why do hurricanes come from africa?

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Anabel Barrows asked a question: Why do hurricanes come from africa?
Asked By: Anabel Barrows
Date created: Sun, Mar 14, 2021 4:36 PM
Date updated: Wed, Jun 22, 2022 12:20 PM
Categories: Hurricane season

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Top best answers to the question «Why do hurricanes come from africa»

Scientists have long understood that convective waves of westward-traveling atmospheric disturbances from the north African coast can be the beginnings of tropical storms and hurricanes… The disturbances propagate from the coast of north Africa, and they get energized in the warm Atlantic climate.

Scientists have long understood that convective waves of westward-traveling atmospheric disturbances from the north African coast can be the beginnings of tropical storms and hurricanes… The disturbances propagate from the coast of north Africa, and they get energized in the warm Atlantic climate.

10 other answers

Hurricanes form out in the Ocean; they do not come from Africa or any other land area.

These tropical waves play a very important role in hurricane formation. Major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale) are typically responsible for the majority...

The origin of many hurricanes in the Atlantic comes from Africa. Several tropical storms have passed through the Cabo Verde Islands, but many others pass just south of the island chain. The systems...

Hurricanes are massive, rotating heat engines powered by the warmth of tropical waters. Category 5 hurricanes can pack winds of 150 mph or more. Hood explained that many of these powerhouses originate with combinations of thunderstorms off Africa. But not all thunderstorms lead to hurricanes.

The role the Sahara Desert plays in hurricane development is related to the easterly winds (coming from the east) generated from the differences between the hot, dry desert in north Africa and the cooler, wetter, and forested coastal environment directly south and surrounding the Gulf of Guinea in west Africa.

Dunion said, “In the Atlantic, more than half of tropical storms and weak hurricanes, and 85 percent of major hurricanes—categories three, four, and five—come from Africa.” Scientists also know that a number of factors, including sea-surface temperatures, unstable atmosphere, and high water-vapor levels, can cause the waves to intensify and form storms.

According to NASA, scientists have long known that hurricanes that hit the Atlantic coasts are born in storm systems off the west coast of northern Africa. Hurricanes, the wettest of storms are driven by weather over one of Earth's driest of places, the Sahara desert. African legend, the paths hurricanes follow.

New research shows that the temperature of clouds in those African storms could help meteorologists figure out which will mutate into coast-and-island-pummeling monsters on the other side of the ...

All tropical cyclones, including hurricanes, develop in the same way. The ocean needs to be at least 26.5 degrees Celsius for a hurricane to form. When wind blows across the warm ocean water, the warm, moist air rapidly rises. As it rises, the moist air cools and the water in it condenses into large storm clouds.

Hurricanes are intense tropical storms that form from disturbances in the tropics and feed on high sea surface temperatures. Wind speeds in a hurricane can exceed 200 km/h (about 125 mph), which is...

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