Why is mitigation important in disaster management?

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Opal Vandervort asked a question: Why is mitigation important in disaster management?
Asked By: Opal Vandervort
Date created: Wed, May 12, 2021 11:46 PM
Date updated: Fri, Jun 24, 2022 1:21 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Why is mitigation important in disaster management»

While these hazards cannot be prevented from occurring, mitigation planning focuses on reducing the impact of such events when they do occur. Mitigation strategies include actions taken in the form of projects that will substantially reduce or eliminate repetitive losses due to the occurrence of the same hazard.

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Mitigation means to reduce the severity of the human and material damage caused by the disaster. Prevention is to ensure that human action or natural phenomena do not result in disaster or emergency. Primary prevention is to reduce - avert - avoid the risk of the event occurring, by getting rid of the hazard or vulnerability.

However, their effects can be mitigated. Disaster management efforts aim to reduce or avoid the potential losses from hazards, assure prompt and appropriate assistance to the victims of a disaster,...

Mitigation is important in Disaster management to reduce its impact through planned measures. Mitigation provides a proven method to follow in communication, action to respond to any disaster. To state in simple word mitigation helps us to firmly respond rather than reacting to the disaster. 204 views

Mitigation strategies include actions taken in the form of projects that will substantially reduce or eliminate repetitive losses due to the occurrence of the same hazard.

Mitigation is the continuing efforts to lessen the impact on people and property by the emergence of a disaster. Mitigation phase is important as it takes in the procedures that direct persons to save lives and to minimize damage in case of an emergency (FEMA, 2016).

Importance of Disaster Mitigation The worst effects of any natural disaster are loss of human life, injuries and health problems of the affected people apart from loss of property and livelihood. Understanding the way that people are killed and injured in a particular disaster is a prerequisite for reducing casualties.

Although mitigation of climate change is a global pro-cess that will take centuries to effect, it is valuable to take certain mitigation steps now. Reducing the production of greenhouse gases in the region will result in immediate improvements in the regional environment and con-tribute to better health and well-being and to economic efficiencies in households and businesses.

Mitigation is most effective when it is part of other community planning processes, regulations, and policies. The publications below will help communities integrate principles of hazard mitigation with planning efforts. Integrating Mitigation With Related Planning Objectives

Joint Commission emergency management (EM) standards identify four phases of emergency preparedness: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Mitigation and preparedness generally occur before an emergency, while response and recovery occur during and after an emergency, largely guided by the HICS.

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