X-rays - curious about astronomy?

Logan Jaskolski asked a question: X-rays - curious about astronomy?
Asked By: Logan Jaskolski
Date created: Wed, May 26, 2021 1:06 AM

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❔ ``curious about astronomy?

The sun's face is many times larger than the Earth's. The light from the sun reaches us as parallel beams. When it's a bit cloudy with gaps between the clouds the beams seem to come from a light source (the sun) just up in the atmosphere and the beams are spread out at angles as if the light source is just a short distance up.

❔ Astronomy links - curious about astronomy?

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. We answer your astronomy questions. Please browse our archive first.

❔ Observational astronomy - curious about astronomy?

Observational astronomy is a powerful tool for multiple fields in the scientific community. From a hobbyist astronomer’s backyard setup to telescope payloads on spacecraft, optical systems literally all around the Earth are currently taking data to help us learn more about our universe.

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X-ray astronomy is a relatively new scientific field focusing on celestial objects that emit X rays. Such objects include stars, galaxies, quasars, pulsars, and black holes. Earth 's atmosphere filters out most X rays. This is fortunate for humans and other life on Earth since a large dose of X rays would be deadly.

The History of X-ray Astronomy. X-ray astronomy is a relatively new science as we have needed satellites to do it; these have only been around since the 1950's. X-rays have a tendency to go through things compared to visible light, but they are also fairly easily absorbed - a few millimetres of bone or a few metres of air will stop them ...

X-ray astronomy dates to 1949 with the discovery that the sun emits X rays. Since X rays could not be observed from ground-based telescopes, V-2 rockets launched from White Sands, N.Mex., occasionally carried telescopes to study solar X-ray emissions.

X-ray astronomy, Study of astronomical objects and phenomena that emit radiation at X-ray wavelengths. Because Earth’s atmosphere absorbs most X-rays, X-ray telescopes and detectors are taken to high altitudes or into space by balloons and spacecraft. In 1949 detectors aboard sounding rockets showed that the Sun gives off X-rays, but it is a weak source; it took 30 more years to clearly ...

X-rays are given off by objects and processes that are extremely hot and energetic, such as superheated jets of material near black holes and the explosion of a giant star called a supernova. Closer to home, our own Sun emits x-rays, as do comets as they encounter the solar wind. The science of x-ray astronomy examines these objects and ...

X-ray astronomy is an observational branch of astronomy which deals with the study of X-ray observation and detection from astronomical objects. X-radiation is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, so instruments to detect X-rays must be taken to high altitude by balloons, sounding rockets, and satellites.X-ray astronomy uses a type of space telescope that can see x-ray radiation which standard ...

X-ray Astronomy. A sounding rocket launch. (Credit: NASA) The study of astronomical objects at the highest energies of X-rays and gamma rays began in the early 1960s. Before then, scientists knew that the Sun was an intense source in these wavebands, but had not observed other objects in the X-ray. Earth's atmosphere absorbs most X-rays and ...

Ask an Astronomer is run by volunteers in the Astronomy Department at Cornell University. We answer your astronomy questions. Please browse our archive first.

Both the Earth and the Moon orbit around the Earth-Moon center of mass, but the Earth has a much smaller orbit because it is much heavier. The size of the wobble can be computed from the Earth-Moon distance multiplied by the mass ratio, which gives around 5,000 km (slightly less than the Earth's radius, 0.003% of the Earth's distance to the Sun).

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